Walking Ghosts: Obama Steps up Nuclear Threat

October 15, 2010

“The walking ghost phase of radiation poisoning is a period of apparent health, lasting for hours or days, following an acute dose of radiation. As its name would suggest, the walking ghost phase is followed by certain death.”

Webster’s Online Dictionary

When the Cold War ended with the dissolution of the Soviet Union back in 1991, it was supposed to signify that the threat of nuclear holocaust was over. No longer would the world suffer under the consciousness that nuclear extermination might occur at any moment. Little did we suspect that, like the walking ghost phase of radiation poisoning, the illusion of safety was but a temporary reprieve; that the use of nuclear weapons would again become not only a renewed possibility, but even quite likely. Recent noises emanating from The White House regarding the issue of Iran’s continued uranium enrichment, in which the Obama administration has refused to rule out the option of a preventive nuclear strike against Iran, have brought the threat of nuclear warfare closer to home than at any other time since the Cuban Missile Crisis. Perhaps the end of the Cold War was really nothing other than the walking ghost phase of the nuclear threat, a temporary respite before impending death.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Iran: So Are They Gonna Get The Bomb?

September 16, 2009

Iran Bomb

On October 1, Iranian negotiators are set to meet with representatives from six nations (the US, UK, France, Germany, Russia and China) to address concerns over Iran’s uranium enrichment program. This comes to a backdrop of Iran already stating their refusal to suspend any such program – which it stresses is strictly for civilian energy purposes – while Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lobbies the international community for stricter sanctions against the Persian nation. As far as the US and Israel are concerned, there is no question that Iran is seeking to develop nuclear weapons, although rather pointedly, they have yet to present any evidence that this is the case.  Amid the atmosphere of mutual distrust and recrimination, it appears  likely that the opposing parties will leave the conference in much the same stance that they went in: deadlocked over the issue of Iran’s uranium enrichment and firmly convinced that there is no common point of consensus. All too predictably, the ominous possibility of military conflict – with all the dire consequences for the world that this might entail – looms in the background. But the means for a diplomatic resolution are readily at hand – if pursued seriously. As the six nations approach negotiations with Iran, the wider issues contributing to a new and ever more dangerous era of nuclear proliferation for the world are going unaddressed.

Read the rest of this entry »